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Plastic Surgery

Hyperbaric Surgery

Whether a patient’s surgery is cosmetic or reconstructive, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a natural tool that may aid in the healing process and shorten recovery time.

Patients undergoing surgery face many post-operative challenges similar to traditional surgery but may also be effected by specific post-operative challenges unique to plastic surgery.

HBOT is an option that may speed healing while minimizing the effects of these other challenges. The high complication rate of these surgeries is attributable to blood supply disruption resulting ischemia, necrosis, infection, wound dehiscence, and excessive scarring.

HBOT improves this by inducing new blood vessel growth.

Many surgeons now recommend pre and/or post-operative HBOT to their patients in order to enhance their healing, recovery and results.

BENEFITS OF HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR PLASTIC SURGERY PATIENTS

Clinical studies have demonstrated the following benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for patients receiving plastic surgery.

PHYSIOLOGICAL BENEFITS

  • Quicker healing
  • Less scarring, bruising and infection

ENHANCES HEALING AND RECOVERY

  • Reduces inflammation
  • Minimizes pain and discomfort
  • Reduces swelling

SUPPORTS HEALING AT THE CELLULAR LEVEL

  • Promotes anti-inflammatory proteins
  • Improved angiogenesis enhancing blood flow to tissue
  • Induces fibroblast activation
  • Enhances collagen production

REDUCES RISK OF INFECTION

  • Elevates phagocytosis to above normal levels
  • Enhances microbial activity
  • Increases intracellular leukocytes

Source: International Hyperbarics Association

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32011977/

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History of Hyperbaric Therapy

History of Hyperbaric Therapy

 

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment that can be traced back to the 1600’s. In 1662, the first renowned chamber was built and operated by a British clergyman named Henshaw. He erected a structure titled, the Domicilium, that was used to treat a variety of conditions. In 1878, Paul Bert, a French physiologist, discovered the link between decompression sickness and nitrogen bubbles. Bert later identified that the pain could be ameliorated with recompression. The concept of treating patients under pressurized conditions was continued by the French surgeon Fontaine, who later built a pressurized mobile operating room in 1879. Fontaine found that inhaled nitrous oxide had a greater potency under pressure, in addition to his patients having improved oxygenation.

In the early 1900’s Dr. Orville Cunningham, a professor of anesthesia, observed that people with particular heart diseases improved better when they lived closer to sea level than those living at higher altitudes. He treated a colleague who was suffering from influenza and was near death due to lung restriction. His resounding success led him to develop what was known as the “Steel Ball Hospital” located along the shore of Lake Erie. The six story structure was erected in 1928 and was 64 feet in diameter. The hospital could reach 3 atmospheres absolute. Unfortunately, due to the depressed financial status of the economy, it was deconstructed during in 1942 for scrap.

Subsequently, hyperbaric chambers were later developed by the military in the 1940’s to treat deep-sea divers who suffered from decompression sickness. In the 1950’s, physicians first employed HBOT during heart and lung surgery, which led to its use for carbon monoxide poisoning in the 1960’s. Since then, over 10,000 clinical trials and case studies have been completed for numerous other health-related applications with the vast majority of results reporting resounding success.

The Science Behind Hyperbaric Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the medical use of oxygen in a pressurized environment, at a level higher than 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA). Increased pressure allows for oxygen to dissolve and saturate the blood plasma (independent of hemoglobin/red blood cells), which yields a broad variety of positive physiological, biochemical and cellular effects. This noninvasive therapy is the most trusted way to increase oxygen levels to all organs of the body. The typical treatment lasts for 60-90 minutes, during which the patient lies down and breathes normally.

HBOT has been demonstrated in several clinical studies to enhance the body’s innate ability to repair and regenerate. It is used as an adjunct therapy to complement and enhance the healing process in both chronic and acute conditions.

It’s like when you purchase a bottle of soda, the CO2 (carbon dioxide) gas bubbles are under pressure, which decreases the size of the bubbles enough that they dissolve into the liquid. Therefore, you are unable to see them. When pressure is released, the volume of each bubble increases and the bubbles appear. While an individual is under pressure, the oxygen molecules decrease in size and are able to dissolve into the blood plasma. This exponentially increases oxygen delivery throughout the body and makes it possible for oxygen to reach inflamed tissue and support optimal cellular and organ functionality.